The Brave Magellan The First Man To Circumnavigate The World Biography 3rd Grade Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

The Brave Magellan: The First Man to Circumnavigate the World - Biography 3rd Grade | Children's Biography Books
Author: Baby Professor
Publisher: Speedy Publishing LLC
ISBN: 1541920902
Pages: 64
Year: 2017-04-15
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You've probably heard of Magellan in your history books but do you really know his story? You might only know of his achievements and incredible voyages but to know where he got his bravery from, you must first know how he grew up. This biography book will give you that chance to learn more about the First Man to Circumnavigate the World. Secure a copy today!
Over the Edge of the World
Author: Laurence Bergreen
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0061865885
Pages: 512
Year: 2009-10-13
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Ferdinand Magellan's daring circumnavigation of the globe in the sixteenth century was a three-year odyssey filled with sex, violence, and amazing adventure. Now in Over the Edge of the World, prize-winning biographer and journalist Laurence Bergreen entwines a variety of candid, firsthand accounts, bringing to life this groundbreaking and majestic tale of discovery that changed both the way explorers would henceforth navigate the oceans and history itself.
Dictionary of American Biography Including Men of the Time
Author: Francis Samuel Drake
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 1019
Year: 1879
View: 696
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Dictionary of American Biography
Author: Francis Samuel Drake
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 1019
Year: 1879
View: 364
Read: 644

A World Lit Only by Fire
Author: William Manchester
Publisher: Back Bay Books
ISBN: 0316082791
Pages: 320
Year: 2009-09-26
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William Manchester's A World Lit Only by Fire is the preeminent popular history of civilization's rebirth after the Dark Ages.
Magellan's Voyage Around the World ...
Author: Antonio Pigafetta, James Alexander Robertson
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 1906
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The Discovery of Jeanne Baret
Author: Glynis Ridley
Publisher: Broadway Books
ISBN: 0307463540
Pages: 304
Year: 2010-12-28
View: 344
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The year was 1765. Eminent botanist Philibert Commerson had just been appointed to a grand new expedition: the first French circumnavigation of the world. As the ships’ official naturalist, Commerson would seek out resources—medicines, spices, timber, food—that could give the French an edge in the ever-accelerating race for empire. Jeanne Baret, Commerson’s young mistress and collaborator, was desperate not to be left behind. She disguised herself as a teenage boy and signed on as his assistant. The journey made the twenty-six-year-old, known to her shipmates as “Jean” rather than “Jeanne,” the first woman to ever sail around the globe. Yet so little is known about this extraordinary woman, whose accomplishments were considered to be subversive, even impossible for someone of her sex and class. When the ships made landfall and the secret lovers disembarked to explore, Baret carried heavy wooden field presses and bulky optical instruments over beaches and hills, impressing observers on the ships’ decks with her obvious strength and stamina. Less obvious were the strips of linen wound tight around her upper body and the months she had spent perfecting her masculine disguise in the streets and marketplaces of Paris. Expedition commander Louis-Antoine de Bougainville recorded in his journal that curious Tahitian natives exposed Baret as a woman, eighteen months into the voyage. But the true story, it turns out, is more complicated. In The Discovery of Jeanne Baret, Glynis Ridley unravels the conflicting accounts recorded by Baret’s crewmates to piece together the real story: how Baret’s identity was in fact widely suspected within just a couple of weeks of embarking, and the painful consequences of those suspicions; the newly discovered notebook, written in Baret’s own hand, that proves her scientific acumen; and the thousands of specimens she collected, most famously the showy vine bougainvillea. Ridley also richly explores Baret’s awkward, sometimes dangerous interactions with the men on the ship, including Baret’s lover, the obsessive and sometimes prickly naturalist; a fashion-plate prince who, with his elaborate wigs and velvet garments, was often mistaken for a woman himself; the sour ship’s surgeon, who despised Baret and Commerson; even a Tahitian islander who joined the expedition and asked Baret to show him how to behave like a Frenchman. But the central character of this true story is Jeanne Baret herself, a working-class woman whose scientific contributions were quietly dismissed and written out of history—until now. Anchored in impeccable original research and bursting with unforgettable characters and exotic settings, The Discovery of Jeanne Baret offers this forgotten heroine a chance to bloom at long last. From the Hardcover edition.
Magellan's Voyage
Author: Antonio Pigafetta
Publisher: Courier Corporation
ISBN: 0486120554
Pages: 208
Year: 2012-10-25
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Remarkable firsthand account by one of the few survivors of Magellan's epochal journey (1519–1522). Remarkably detailed record of new lands, flora and fauna, shipboard life, etc. Introduction. 28 halftones. Map.
The Great Explorers
Author: Samuel Eliot Morison
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0195042220
Pages: 752
Year: 1986
View: 359
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Describes North American voyages and discoveries of European adventurers before 1600 and early explorations south of the Caribbean
Marco Polo
Author: Laurence Bergreen
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 1400078806
Pages: 415
Year: 2008-10-21
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A portrait of the thirteenth-century explorer, adventurer, and global traveler follows Marco Polo from his youth in Venice to his journey to Asia and role in the court of Kublai Khan, to his return to Europe, and discusses his influence on the history ofhis era.
Sapiens
Author: Yuval Noah Harari
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062316109
Pages: 464
Year: 2015-02-10
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New York Times Bestseller A Summer Reading Pick for President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.” One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us? Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, Sapiens integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas. Dr. Harari also compels us to look ahead, because over the last few decades humans have begun to bend laws of natural selection that have governed life for the past four billion years. We are acquiring the ability to design not only the world around us, but also ourselves. Where is this leading us, and what do we want to become? Featuring 27 photographs, 6 maps, and 25 illustrations/diagrams, this provocative and insightful work is sure to spark debate and is essential reading for aficionados of Jared Diamond, James Gleick, Matt Ridley, Robert Wright, and Sharon Moalem.
Farther Than Any Man
Author: Martin Dugard
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0743436393
Pages: 304
Year: 2001-09-13
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James Cook never laid eyes on the sea until he was in his teens. He then began an extraordinary rise from farmboy outsider to the hallowed rank of captain of the Royal Navy, leading three historic journeys that would forever link his name with fearless exploration (and inspire pop-culture heroes like Captain Hook and Captain James T. Kirk). In Farther Than Any Man, noted modern-day adventurer Martin Dugard strips away the myth of Cook and instead portrays a complex, conflicted man of tremendous ambition (at times to a fault), intellect (though Cook was routinely underestimated) and sheer hardheadedness. When Great Britain announced a major circumnavigation in 1768 -- a mission cloaked in science, but aimed at the pursuit of world power -- it came as a political surprise that James Cook was given command. Cook's surveying skills had contributed to the British victory over France in the Seven Years' War in 1763, but no commoner had ever commanded a Royal Navy vessel. Endeavor's stunning three-year journey changed the face of modern exploration, charting the vast Pacific waters, the eastern coasts of New Zealand and Australia, and making landfall in Tahiti, Tierra del Fuego, and Rio de Janeiro. After returning home a hero, Cook yearned to get back to sea. He soon took control of the Resolution and returned to his beloved Pacific, in search of the elusive Southern Continent. It was on this trip that Cook's taste for power became an obsession, and his legendary kindness to island natives became an expectation of worship -- traits that would lead him first to greatness, then to catastrophe. Full of action, lush description, and fascinating historical characters like King George III and Master William Bligh, Dugard's gripping account of the life and gruesome demise of Capt. James Cook is a thrilling story of a discoverer hell-bent on traveling farther than any man.
Master and Commander
Author: Patrick O'Brian
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393325172
Pages: 459
Year: 1990
View: 987
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Introduces Captain Jack Aubrey and Stephen Maturin, ship's surgeon and intelligence agent, in the age of the Napoleonic wars.
Madness, Betrayal and the Lash
Author: Stephen R. Bown
Publisher: D & M Publishers
ISBN: 1926685717
Pages: 272
Year: 2009-12-01
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From 1792 to 1795, George Vancouver sailed the Pacific as the captain of his own expedition — and as an agent of imperial ambition. To map a place is to control it, and Britain had its eyes on America's Pacific coast. And map it Vancouver did. His voyage was one of history’s greatest feats of maritime daring, discovery, and diplomacy, and his marine survey of Hawaii and the Pacific coast was at its time the most comprehensive ever undertaken. But just two years after returning to Britain, the 40-year-old Vancouver, hounded by critics, shamed by public humiliation at the fists of an aristocratic sailor he had flogged, and blacklisted because of a perceived failure to follow the Admiralty’s directives, died in poverty, nearly forgotten. In this riveting and perceptive biography, historian Stephen Bown delves into the events that destroyed Vancouver’s reputation and restores his position as one of the greatest explorers of the Age of Discovery.